Audiofly AF160

So to continue my run of content on this website, I have decided to share one of our favourite posts this week. I was hesitant to add it to this website as I really did not want to offend the original writer, but I trust he/she is happy that I enjoyed reading their work and wanted to share it with my readers.

Design
The bulky maroon/brown-and-black earpieces let you know immediately that the AF160 means business. Its easily detachable, black-and-gray braided cable descends from each earpiece, then joins into a single cord with a cloth casing. Semi-rigid wiring near the earpieces offers a moldable, extremely secure, over-the-ear fit. There’s no in-line remote control or microphone—your next clue that the AF160 is not for the casual listener.

Armed with a handsome brown leather hard case, the AF160 feels like a luxury item. It comes with six pairs of eartips: three of the standard silicone round variety, and three flange-shaped pairs. Also included: An earwax-cleaning tool, a 1/4-inch headset jack adapter, and an airplane jack adapter. No one can accuse Audiofly of skimping on accessories or design details.

Performance
Calling the AF160 light on bass response would be doing the earphones a bit of a disservice. In an era of overly bass-boosted earphones and Headphones that shift the balance way too far toward the lows, the AF160’s sound signature is a breath of fresh air. On tracks with tremendous low frequency content, like The Knife’s “Silent Shout,” the AF160 delivers the closest thing to a clinical, flat response sound I have heard in earphones in quite some time. However, at top (and unsafe) listening levels, it also distorts quite a bit on this track. That should never happen in this price range. At more moderate levels, the AF160 sounds defiantly light on low frequencies, with a focus on the high-mids and highs.

Audiofly AF160 inlineI was curious to see if the AF160 was capable of producing big bass sound when forced to, so I connected the earphones to my Marantz stereo receiver and pumped the bass level to maximum. Interestingly, at moderate-to-loud volumes, the AF160 suddenly delivered some beautifully rich, vibrant bass. It’s a bit odd that it needed the Marantz receiver’s bass levels to be maxed out in order to deliver any real semblance of low-end, but the point is that the AF160 is capable of bringing out the lows in a mix you if use an equalizer, either on your mobile device, or on your stereo at home. It just doesn’t do very much of this on its own.

Back to regular listening on my iPhone 5s, Bill Callahan’s “Drover” sounds crisp and beautiful on the AF160. Yes, it’s again light on the low frequencies, but its focus on the treble edge of his baritone vocals and the guitar strumming deliver this mix cleanly and powerfully. This approach can’t work too well for all genres, however.

On Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild”, the kick drum loop gets a nice boost to its attack, so that the hits slice through the mix. It sounds sharp and clean, but the loop lacks much in the way of bass presence, and the sub-bass synth hits that punctuate the beat have very little low frequency power. For electronic tracks like The Knife’s and modern pop and hip hop mixes like this one, the AF160’s approach to bass seems a bit too gentle and hands-off. These types of tracks can end up sounding weak.

Classical tracks, like John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances,” manage to sound a bit fuller than I would have guessed based on the sounds of the previous tracks. The higher register strings, brass, woodwinds, and percussion take center stage here, with focused sound that is never too bright. The lower register strings, however, somehow seem to have a little extra life at times. It’s nothing like what some bass boost might bring out in them, but it is more presence than the sub-bass frequencies have on the aforementioned tracks. Basically, this is the epitome of a flat-response style sound signature—a sound that is less popular now than ever, as the ubiquity of mega-bass changes the balance of mixes, and perhaps even the way some engineers approach mixing.

If your budget is sky-high and you want an even more pro-level-style in-ear pair, the Shure SE846$999.00 at Amazon and Sennheiser IE 800$999.99 at Crutchfield both sound amazing. You can also find the clinical sound minus the AF160’s pricing in earphone pairs like the Etymotic ER-4PT$264.99 at Amazon, the go-to flat response in-ear pair for years now, and the Westone W10$199.99 at Amazon with its slightly more low-end-focused balance. I was turned off by the AF160’s distortion considering its price, but at normal levels it’s not an issue. I tend to like a bit more bass response than what the AF160 offers, so I’d probably augment the low-end a bit with a subtle EQ, Plenty of listeners who a flat, mids-and-highs-focused won’t be disappointed, though. From the secure fit to the classy design and accessories, the Audiofly AF160 is every bit a high-end, audiophile-grade earphone pair—if you can get past the distortion at top volumes.

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What Features Should I be Looking For if I Want a Bluetooth Headset for Conference Calls

When we found this article we were so excited, having sought for over a year for this, finding it on this blog was an exciting day for me.

Hi Tina, thanks for the question.

OK, so your basic requirements ought to be simple enough. Firstly, you’re going to need great sound quality. You’ll need to hear and process important information quickly and without asking the boss to repeat him/herself (unless of course you are the boss, Tina, in which case you don’t want your employees making you repeat yourself over and over).

The next feature on our list should be a great microphone, its no good being able to hear everyone clearly if they can’t understand a word you’re saying! The microphone ought to be able to transmit as cleanly as possible, without picking up too much background noise (e.g. dogs barking etc).

Another factor to consider is comfort, some calls can drag on for hours longer than they were intended to and you need to ensure that you are thinking clearly about what is being said, rather than worrying about the nagging pain on the side of your head! You’ll need a earphone that is comfortable and easy to wear at all times, something that, ideally, you’ll forget you’re even wearing. If you aren’t sure how to find that, try on a friend’s headset for 15 minutes and see how it feels, if it is starting to become uncomfortable, you’re probably better off with a different design.

Once you’ve got these bases covered, you’ve probably found the right headset for you, but I’d read all the reviews you can find before purchasing, just in case! The truth is, that if you want a good quality headset, you’re going to need to spend out a little.

A Bluetooth headset is actually a good choice here, because it gives you the freedom to move around. My Dad used to take conference calls with his headset; casually dispensing advice to other attendees whilst tending to his bonsai trees. Sometimes having a little distraction can make all the difference. His thoughts were focussed and his mind was calm. This allowed him to take several conference calls a day and always be at his best. Sitting down for extended periods of time can be more tiring than people think!

Thanks again for the question, Tina, good luck in your quest for the right headset, as well as your career.

Atomic Bass Earphones For iPhones iPods Android And Mobile Phones

headphonesWithout giving too much about this earpiece article, but I thought it fascinating and significant to what I’m now doing.

Music lovers around the world have often been promised amazing atomic bass from many a pair of earphones bought in-store or over the Internet and found themselves instantly returning or handing them over to their kid brother who has no conception of what amazing bass is all about.

Bass aficionados understand that the music they listen to should come through crystal clear, without distortion, or a sound similar to car speakers that clinked and clanked back in the 80s. Additionally, headphones that produce beautiful bass must fit snug in the ear for full impact, while inspiring hours of listening because they are undeniably comfortable.

Atomic Bass Earphones offer a combination of amazing bass and ultimate comfort. Featuring soft earbuds that slip easily into the ear canal, a built in microphone for phone calls and ultra-light aluminum housing, you can’t go wrong! Atomic Bass are ideal iphones earphones and earphones for ipad.

Not to mention that CNET and other major reviewers have placed Atomic Bass in the best headsets category. Radius Earphones are also perfect for Android phones, computers, PC tablets, iPods, Blackberries and more.

Atomic Bass earphones with mic fit so snugly in the ear that they are perfect for just about any activity under the sun. Whether you are heading out for a run, going on a rock climbing expedition, riding your bike to work, driving on the way to work, shopping at your favorite mall or sitting on your couch at home, you’ll always experience unparalleled comfort.
Enjoy a comfortable and secure fit earphone for extended use – without pain or ear fatigue. Atomic Bass are easily stored when they aren’t being used within an included pouch that can be placed strategically in your computer bag or purse.

Many are under the false assumption that to experience amazing bass, one has to spend hundreds of dollars on earphones. Atomic Bass Earphones retail for only $39, and their innovator & manufacturer Radius Earphones are so certain that its customers (including you) will love them, so they offer a money back guarantee.
What’s more…the company prides itself on creating top-quality products and takes its guarantee a step further by offering a 1-year replacement policy if their products fail or are damaged. To learn more about Radius’ guarantees and catalog of products, visit Radius Earphones Ordering is secure & easy and delivery is always prompt!